Freshman Seminar 12: Racism and Anti-Racism
(Fall, 1998)
Professor Halford H. Fairchild

Course Description:  This course explores Racism and Anti-Racism.  An emphasis is on developing students’ written and oral expression.
Text:  Racism and Anti-Racism in World Perspective Edited by Benjamin P. Bowser (1995)
Office Hours/Phone & E-mail:  Wed. 10-12:00; Th 2:30 – 3:50 and by appointment.  Phone:  7-3056 (607-3056 from off-campus in the 909 area code).  E-mail:  Hfairchild@pitzer.edu (school) or E2e4mate@aol.com (home).  Home phone:  (323) 734-0809.
 
Date
Topic/Readings
9-1 Course Overview and Introductions; Our ‘ostrich mentality’ on racism by Halford H. Fairchild (LA Times; April 12; 1987)
9-3 Introduction:  The Global Community; Racism; and Anti-Racism by Benjamin P. Bowser.; A constant state of rage by Halford H. Fairchild (Psych Discourse, 28(11); 3.
9-8 Chapter 1:  Europe’s Oldest Chapter in the History of Black-WhiteRelations by Frank M. Snowden; Jr.; Black history; Black psychology and the future of the world by Halford H. Fairchild (Psych Discourse; 27(2);3)
9-10 Supplemental Reading:  Introduction:  Divining our Racial Themes by Derrick Bell (from Faces at the Bottom of the Well).; Film: The Boy Who Painted Christ Black by John Henrik Clarke
9-15 Chapter 2:  “If Toads Could Speak”:  How the Myth of Race Took Hold and Flourished in the Minds of Europe’s Renaissance Colonizers by Peter H. Wood.
9-17 Film:  Skin Deep
9-22 Historical Perspective; Chapter 3:  Spanish Ideology and the Practice of Inequality in the New World by Laura A. Lewis.
9-24 Chapter 4:  Anti-Racism in the United States:  1865-1900 by Herbert Aptheker.
9-29 WRITING ASSIGNMENT I IS DUE:  Based on readings and class discussion from the previous week(s), what are the origins of racism and anti-racism in world affairs?  What does this understanding imply for the current status of racism in contemporary societies?  What does it imply for the elimination of racism?  Students should try to integrate and synthesize the material in Chapters 1-4.  (Target length:  5 pages plus or minus 1).  [Students may re-write thispaper for a re-grading if they like.  Re-writes are due 10-13-98.]
10-1 LIBRARY ASSIGNMENT:  Find five articles (none that are on this syllabus); that are concerned with racism.  At least two of these articles should be on “anti-racism.”  (NO CLASS TODAY)
10-6 Chapter 5:  Mass Communication; Popular Culture; and Racism by Polly E. McLean; N Word should be odious from anyone by Halford H. Fairchild (LA Times; September 16; 1987)
10-8 Film:  Star Crusaders
10-13 Chapter 6:  White Radicals; White Liberals; and White People: Rebuilding the Anti-Racist Coalition by Bob Blauner
10-15 On Whiteness by Halford H. Fairchild (Psych Discourse, 28(4);3).; Glorification of things White by Halford H. Fairchild (Journal of Black Psychology; 14(2); 73-74.
10-20 Fall Break
10-22 Film:  The Reunion by Maya Angelou
10-27 Chapter 7:  Changing the Subject:  Race and Genderin Feminist Discourse by Karen Dugger (Turn in paper on this reading today.)
10-29 WRITING ASSIGNMENT TWO IS DUE:  Based on your readings of Chapters 5-7 (and related class discussions); in what ways is racism a “cultural assumption”?  How can we best understand racism at the nexus of culture; politics and gender?  What does this understanding imply for the elimination of racism?  Students should try to integrateand synthesize the material in Chapters 5-7.  (Target length: 5 pages plus or minus 1).  [Students may re-write this paper for are-grading if they like.  Re-writes are due 11-10-98.]
11-3 Chapter 8:  Racism and anti-racism in Great Britain: Historical Trends and Contemporary Issues by John Solomos
11-5 Chapter 9:  Racism and Anti-Racism in Western Europe by Louis Kushnick
11-10 Chapter 10:  Introduction to the Analysis of Racism and Anti-Racismin Brazil by Rosana Heringer; Chapter 11:  Racism and Anti-Racismin Brazil:  A Postmodern Perspective by Antono S.A. Guimaraes
11-12 Chapter 12:  Black Resistance in Brazil:  A Matter of Necessity by Rosangela Maria Vieira; A sad tale of persecuted minorities by Halford H. Fairchild, LA Times, March 24; 1991.
11-17 Chapter 13:  Racism and Anti-Racism in the Caribbean by Ralph R. Premdas; The problem of the 21st Century by Halford H. Fairchild (Psych Discourse, 28 (7-8), 3-4)
11-19 Film:  Long Black Song; by Richard Wright
11-24 Chapter 14:  The Long Shadow of Apartheid Ideology: The Case of Open Schools in South Africa by Mokubung Nkomo; Zanele Mkwanazi-Twala; & Nazir Carrim
11-26 Thanksgiving Vacation
12-1 Chapter 15:  Racism in the Modern World Community by Benjamin P. Bowser (Turn in paper on this reading today.)
12-3 WRITING ASSIGNMENT III IS DUE:  Based on your readings of Chapters 8-15 (and related class discussions); how is our understandingof racism improved when taken in a variety of international contexts? How does that understanding lead to strategies for eliminating racism at home and abroad?  Students should try to integrate and synthesize the material in Chapters 8-15.  (Target length:  5 pages plus or minus 1).  [Students may re-write this paper for a re-grading if they like.  Re-writes are due 12-10-98.]
12-8 Film:  to be announced.
12-10 Discussion

Weekly Papers

Each week, students should prepare brief “thumbnail sketches” and “reaction statements” of the readings and of the previous film presentation (when applicable).  The “thumbnail sketch” should be one or two paragraphs (per reading or lecture/film)—keep the sketch brief—whereas the “reaction statement” may be one or two paragraphs or one or two pages (per reading or lecture/film).  The “reaction statement” should focus on your personal reaction to one or more aspect of the material.  Each of these papers will be subjectively graded on a 100 point scale. Papers are due at the beginning of class every Tuesday, but will be collected every Thursday.   Late papers receive 50% credit (regardless of excuse).

Grading

There are 13 weekly papers (corresponding to the 13 weeks of assigned readings) that total 1300 points. Class participation is awarded up to 1000 points (subjectively determined by the instructor).  Each of the three writing assignments is worth up to 1000 points.  Attendance is worth 100 points per day (70 points if more than 5 minutes tardy), for 2700 possible points.  The total possible points for the semester is thus 8,000. (1)  A:  92% or above; A/B:  88%-91.9%; B:  82%-87.9%; B/C:  78%-81.9%; C:  72%-77.9%; etc.
(1)  Subject to change
 
 

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Background photograph copyright by Halford H. Fairchild, 1999